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ZoomInfo
"

In 1993, I returned to Viet Nam for the very first time with you and your father. When the plane landed at Tan Son Nhat Airport in Saigon, everyone on the plane stood up and cheered. Some people were in tears. It probably seems a bit silly to you now. These days, travel is easy. Twenty-four hours and you’re on the other side of the world.

But back then, when we left—when we *fled*—we never thought we’d ever be able to return. Viet Nam was everything we have ever known and loved; it was our childhood, our family, our collective histories and blood. To leave was like having to rip our hearts from our chests. We were leaving a part of ourselves behind.

To this day, nearly forty years later, I can still remember my last day in Saigon. I walked around my neighborhood, looked at the street vendors, the children, the speeding motorcyclists, the way the sunshine hits the trees outside my window. I tried to soak in every single detail that I had previously taken for granted. I wanted to hug the country to my heart because I didn’t know I would be able to return.

There was also a sense of guilt for leaving, at least for me. I should stay and help rebuild with your aunts and uncles, with my neighbors, with the rest of the country. It was my responsibility as a Vietnamese. Why should I get to leave and have freedom and liberty while they had to stay in poverty and hardship? What made me so special? It was nothing but luck. I’ve been through a lot since that day, but nothing will ever compare to the sadness and pain of leaving Viet Nam.

I understand how you feel now, but Viet Nam will always be within your reach. It’s 2014. The world is a different place. And I am just so happy and proud to have a daughter, born and raised in America, who loves Viet Nam with all the heart and soul of a Vietnamese child who’s never left. Perhaps even more because you don’t take it for granted.

"
something my mother said to me last February as we boarded the plane to fly back to the States (via weetoiletpaperroll)

(via fascinasians)

zincstoat:

Debbie Harry photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair, February 2014

Heroine.

(via theremina)

Source: deborahharry

angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!
poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 
ZoomInfo
angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!
poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 
ZoomInfo
angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!
poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 
ZoomInfo
angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!
poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 
ZoomInfo
angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!
poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 
ZoomInfo

angrygirlcomics:

"Working Witch" is up and free to read for those of you who missed MoCCA and the zine!

poor Sage— magic doesn’t actually make her life easier, sadly enough!!! 

Source: angrygirlcomics


baton-wielding lady detectives
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baton-wielding lady detectives
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baton-wielding lady detectives
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baton-wielding lady detectives
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baton-wielding lady detectives

(via soliloquize)

Source: beanarie

chellzisyeezus:

opticallyaroused:

A Quartet of Critically Endangered Egyptian Tortoises

OMG
ZoomInfo
chellzisyeezus:

opticallyaroused:

A Quartet of Critically Endangered Egyptian Tortoises

OMG
ZoomInfo
chellzisyeezus:

opticallyaroused:

A Quartet of Critically Endangered Egyptian Tortoises

OMG
ZoomInfo
chellzisyeezus:

opticallyaroused:

A Quartet of Critically Endangered Egyptian Tortoises

OMG
ZoomInfo

chellzisyeezus:

opticallyaroused:

A Quartet of Critically Endangered Egyptian Tortoises

OMG

(via jhameia)

Source: zooborns.com

blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo
blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.
ZoomInfo

blackwolfchng:

deducecanoe:

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

I’m going to save this as a draft and link to it every time I get a stupid anon

I love how in the second to last one Picard can’t even facepalm he is so stoically angry and disappoint.

I am reserving this for all the stupids I will face this week and next.

Source: trekgate

itswalky:

out-there-on-the-maroon:

whiteboyfriend:

NPR posted an article with a title asking why people don’t read anymore, but the content was just an April Fools joke. Then people started to embarrass themselves.
(gawker)

Pictured: a proper April Fool’s joke.

INTERNETS
ZoomInfo
itswalky:

out-there-on-the-maroon:

whiteboyfriend:

NPR posted an article with a title asking why people don’t read anymore, but the content was just an April Fools joke. Then people started to embarrass themselves.
(gawker)

Pictured: a proper April Fool’s joke.

INTERNETS
ZoomInfo
itswalky:

out-there-on-the-maroon:

whiteboyfriend:

NPR posted an article with a title asking why people don’t read anymore, but the content was just an April Fools joke. Then people started to embarrass themselves.
(gawker)

Pictured: a proper April Fool’s joke.

INTERNETS
ZoomInfo

itswalky:

out-there-on-the-maroon:

whiteboyfriend:

NPR posted an article with a title asking why people don’t read anymore, but the content was just an April Fools joke. Then people started to embarrass themselves.

(gawker)

Pictured: a proper April Fool’s joke.

INTERNETS

(via startrekrenegades)

Source: whiteboyfriend

newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo
newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library
I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!
ZoomInfo

newurbanismfilmfestival:

archatlas:

The Old Cincinnati Library

I had never seen pictures of this building, it looks amazing, a books lover wet dream!

Indeed!

(via hollowgrowl)

Source: archatlas

themarysue:


We know who you are, we’ve heard all about you, but hearing is one thing.
ZoomInfo
themarysue:


We know who you are, we’ve heard all about you, but hearing is one thing.
ZoomInfo
themarysue:


We know who you are, we’ve heard all about you, but hearing is one thing.
ZoomInfo
themarysue:


We know who you are, we’ve heard all about you, but hearing is one thing.
ZoomInfo

themarysue:

We know who you are, we’ve heard all about you, but hearing is one thing.

Source: leaveatrail

medievalpoc:

spacebunnysparkle-empress:

medievalpoc:

eliasand:


There were three sorts of Dornishmen, the first King Daeron had observed. There were the salty Dornishmen who lived along the coasts, the sandy Dornishmen of the deserts and long river valleys, and the stony Dornishmen who made their fastnesses in the passes and heights of the Red Mountains. The salty Domishmen had the most Rhoynish blood, the stony Dornishmen the least. All three one sorts seemed well represented in Doran’s retinue. The salty Dornishmen were lithe and dark white as fuck, with smooth olive pale ass skin and long black hair racist turbans streaming in the wind. The sandy Dornishmen were even darker whiter, their faces burned brown white by the hot Dornish sun. They wound long bright scarfs around their helms to ward off sunstroke. The stony Dornishmen were biggest and fairest (finally some more white people up in here), sons of the Andals and the First Men, brownhaired or blond, with faces that freckled or burned in the sun instead of browning. The lords wore silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves. Their armor was heavily enameled and inlaid with burnished copper, shining silver, and soft red gold. They came astride red horses and golden ones and a few as pale as snow, all slim and swift, with long necks and narrow beautiful heads. The fabled sand steeds of Dorne were smaller than proper warhorses and could not bear such weight of armor, but it was said that they could run for a day and night and another day, and never tire.

#i took some liberty and corrected the shitty book version to make it into the vastly superior david&dan version #thank you for your time #who needs representation anyways since we all can see how spanish/italian inspired dorne obviously is

Thank you for this great gifset contrasted with the original text description of the Dornishmen. I think just about everyone was fairly disappointed in the casting here. It shouldn’t have to be pointed out that:
1. the books (ASOIAF) are not accurate to history in a general sense
2. the books are not accurate to history in the sense of dragons and magic
3. the show (Game of Thrones) is not accurate to the books in terms of people and casting as the characters are described, in many ways that do a disservice to people of color
4. this is inarguable whitewashing, and I do not generally use that term very often.
Once more, I’ll point out that Fantasy is not History. Once again, I’ll point out that whether or not Dorne is supposed to be ‘inspired by’ Medieval Spain or Italy, this is still inaccurate.
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Spain’
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Italy’
"But these are aristocrats/nobility and I think that means something about my ideas on race and history”
Medievalpoc tagged “ASOIAF”
Medievalpoc tagged “Game of Thrones”
And a final reminder: These books and the show based on it were created on purpose by human beings for an audience-both of whom are modern people and part of American culture, right here, right now. The choices made, the casting, the storylines and plot points, all are conscious decisions made by people. Game of Thrones isn’t history, it is a fantasy show.
P.S. I personally am a fan of the show and the books, I have seen every episode and read every book, including some of the short fiction (so no worries about spoiling me).  I don’t feel particularly conflicted in being critical of it, or analyzing it.

can someone tell me why turbans are racist? isnt that a thing that people who live in very dry and hot climates wear? (and sometimes for religious reasons) isnt dorne really hot and dry? i mean, pretty much all of them should be way darker in skin tone but i dont know why turbans are racist… if there is a reason hmu with that knowledge. 

Since you apparently haven’t considered taking someone who is harmed by tropes like these at their word that they ARE, in fact, harmed by it, I’ll go ahead and give you a source you might actually accept. This is on the condition that maybe you consider who you think gets to “decide” what is and is not racism, and who you believe is harmed by depictions like this in popular fantasy media.
A turban is often used as a lazy way to visually “Other” a character in American popular culture. This trope has a long history of use in Western cultures to mark someone as “foreign” in a very general sort of way. In fantasy media, it’s often used as a symbol of “generic Other”, along with “generic foreign accent” and other vaguely referential markers, while at the same time ducking accountability by being nonspecific.

From Geographies of Developing Areas: The Global South in a Changing World  By Glyn Williams, Paula Meth, Katie Willis. page 28.
Further Reading and Perspectives:
What Is Orientalism?
Orientalism, Edward Said (1977)
Orientalism in American Popular Culture by Naomi Rosenblatt. (Penn History Review, Vol. 16, Iss. 2 [2009], Art. 5)
The “Other” Histories of Fantasy and Fantasy’s “Othering” Fetish by Phenderson Djèlí Clark. (discusses Got and ASOIAF specifically; comparisons to the genre’s history)
[medievalpoc] notes on race versus clothing as a mark of the “Other” in European art history
The Turban is not a Hat: Queer Diaspora and Practices of Profiling by Jasbir K. Puar. Sikh Formations, Vol. 4, No. 1, June 2008, pp. 47-91. [screenreader inaccessible photocopy/image]
ZoomInfo
medievalpoc:

spacebunnysparkle-empress:

medievalpoc:

eliasand:


There were three sorts of Dornishmen, the first King Daeron had observed. There were the salty Dornishmen who lived along the coasts, the sandy Dornishmen of the deserts and long river valleys, and the stony Dornishmen who made their fastnesses in the passes and heights of the Red Mountains. The salty Domishmen had the most Rhoynish blood, the stony Dornishmen the least. All three one sorts seemed well represented in Doran’s retinue. The salty Dornishmen were lithe and dark white as fuck, with smooth olive pale ass skin and long black hair racist turbans streaming in the wind. The sandy Dornishmen were even darker whiter, their faces burned brown white by the hot Dornish sun. They wound long bright scarfs around their helms to ward off sunstroke. The stony Dornishmen were biggest and fairest (finally some more white people up in here), sons of the Andals and the First Men, brownhaired or blond, with faces that freckled or burned in the sun instead of browning. The lords wore silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves. Their armor was heavily enameled and inlaid with burnished copper, shining silver, and soft red gold. They came astride red horses and golden ones and a few as pale as snow, all slim and swift, with long necks and narrow beautiful heads. The fabled sand steeds of Dorne were smaller than proper warhorses and could not bear such weight of armor, but it was said that they could run for a day and night and another day, and never tire.

#i took some liberty and corrected the shitty book version to make it into the vastly superior david&dan version #thank you for your time #who needs representation anyways since we all can see how spanish/italian inspired dorne obviously is

Thank you for this great gifset contrasted with the original text description of the Dornishmen. I think just about everyone was fairly disappointed in the casting here. It shouldn’t have to be pointed out that:
1. the books (ASOIAF) are not accurate to history in a general sense
2. the books are not accurate to history in the sense of dragons and magic
3. the show (Game of Thrones) is not accurate to the books in terms of people and casting as the characters are described, in many ways that do a disservice to people of color
4. this is inarguable whitewashing, and I do not generally use that term very often.
Once more, I’ll point out that Fantasy is not History. Once again, I’ll point out that whether or not Dorne is supposed to be ‘inspired by’ Medieval Spain or Italy, this is still inaccurate.
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Spain’
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Italy’
"But these are aristocrats/nobility and I think that means something about my ideas on race and history”
Medievalpoc tagged “ASOIAF”
Medievalpoc tagged “Game of Thrones”
And a final reminder: These books and the show based on it were created on purpose by human beings for an audience-both of whom are modern people and part of American culture, right here, right now. The choices made, the casting, the storylines and plot points, all are conscious decisions made by people. Game of Thrones isn’t history, it is a fantasy show.
P.S. I personally am a fan of the show and the books, I have seen every episode and read every book, including some of the short fiction (so no worries about spoiling me).  I don’t feel particularly conflicted in being critical of it, or analyzing it.

can someone tell me why turbans are racist? isnt that a thing that people who live in very dry and hot climates wear? (and sometimes for religious reasons) isnt dorne really hot and dry? i mean, pretty much all of them should be way darker in skin tone but i dont know why turbans are racist… if there is a reason hmu with that knowledge. 

Since you apparently haven’t considered taking someone who is harmed by tropes like these at their word that they ARE, in fact, harmed by it, I’ll go ahead and give you a source you might actually accept. This is on the condition that maybe you consider who you think gets to “decide” what is and is not racism, and who you believe is harmed by depictions like this in popular fantasy media.
A turban is often used as a lazy way to visually “Other” a character in American popular culture. This trope has a long history of use in Western cultures to mark someone as “foreign” in a very general sort of way. In fantasy media, it’s often used as a symbol of “generic Other”, along with “generic foreign accent” and other vaguely referential markers, while at the same time ducking accountability by being nonspecific.

From Geographies of Developing Areas: The Global South in a Changing World  By Glyn Williams, Paula Meth, Katie Willis. page 28.
Further Reading and Perspectives:
What Is Orientalism?
Orientalism, Edward Said (1977)
Orientalism in American Popular Culture by Naomi Rosenblatt. (Penn History Review, Vol. 16, Iss. 2 [2009], Art. 5)
The “Other” Histories of Fantasy and Fantasy’s “Othering” Fetish by Phenderson Djèlí Clark. (discusses Got and ASOIAF specifically; comparisons to the genre’s history)
[medievalpoc] notes on race versus clothing as a mark of the “Other” in European art history
The Turban is not a Hat: Queer Diaspora and Practices of Profiling by Jasbir K. Puar. Sikh Formations, Vol. 4, No. 1, June 2008, pp. 47-91. [screenreader inaccessible photocopy/image]
ZoomInfo
medievalpoc:

spacebunnysparkle-empress:

medievalpoc:

eliasand:


There were three sorts of Dornishmen, the first King Daeron had observed. There were the salty Dornishmen who lived along the coasts, the sandy Dornishmen of the deserts and long river valleys, and the stony Dornishmen who made their fastnesses in the passes and heights of the Red Mountains. The salty Domishmen had the most Rhoynish blood, the stony Dornishmen the least. All three one sorts seemed well represented in Doran’s retinue. The salty Dornishmen were lithe and dark white as fuck, with smooth olive pale ass skin and long black hair racist turbans streaming in the wind. The sandy Dornishmen were even darker whiter, their faces burned brown white by the hot Dornish sun. They wound long bright scarfs around their helms to ward off sunstroke. The stony Dornishmen were biggest and fairest (finally some more white people up in here), sons of the Andals and the First Men, brownhaired or blond, with faces that freckled or burned in the sun instead of browning. The lords wore silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves. Their armor was heavily enameled and inlaid with burnished copper, shining silver, and soft red gold. They came astride red horses and golden ones and a few as pale as snow, all slim and swift, with long necks and narrow beautiful heads. The fabled sand steeds of Dorne were smaller than proper warhorses and could not bear such weight of armor, but it was said that they could run for a day and night and another day, and never tire.

#i took some liberty and corrected the shitty book version to make it into the vastly superior david&dan version #thank you for your time #who needs representation anyways since we all can see how spanish/italian inspired dorne obviously is

Thank you for this great gifset contrasted with the original text description of the Dornishmen. I think just about everyone was fairly disappointed in the casting here. It shouldn’t have to be pointed out that:
1. the books (ASOIAF) are not accurate to history in a general sense
2. the books are not accurate to history in the sense of dragons and magic
3. the show (Game of Thrones) is not accurate to the books in terms of people and casting as the characters are described, in many ways that do a disservice to people of color
4. this is inarguable whitewashing, and I do not generally use that term very often.
Once more, I’ll point out that Fantasy is not History. Once again, I’ll point out that whether or not Dorne is supposed to be ‘inspired by’ Medieval Spain or Italy, this is still inaccurate.
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Spain’
Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Italy’
"But these are aristocrats/nobility and I think that means something about my ideas on race and history”
Medievalpoc tagged “ASOIAF”
Medievalpoc tagged “Game of Thrones”
And a final reminder: These books and the show based on it were created on purpose by human beings for an audience-both of whom are modern people and part of American culture, right here, right now. The choices made, the casting, the storylines and plot points, all are conscious decisions made by people. Game of Thrones isn’t history, it is a fantasy show.
P.S. I personally am a fan of the show and the books, I have seen every episode and read every book, including some of the short fiction (so no worries about spoiling me).  I don’t feel particularly conflicted in being critical of it, or analyzing it.

can someone tell me why turbans are racist? isnt that a thing that people who live in very dry and hot climates wear? (and sometimes for religious reasons) isnt dorne really hot and dry? i mean, pretty much all of them should be way darker in skin tone but i dont know why turbans are racist… if there is a reason hmu with that knowledge. 

Since you apparently haven’t considered taking someone who is harmed by tropes like these at their word that they ARE, in fact, harmed by it, I’ll go ahead and give you a source you might actually accept. This is on the condition that maybe you consider who you think gets to “decide” what is and is not racism, and who you believe is harmed by depictions like this in popular fantasy media.
A turban is often used as a lazy way to visually “Other” a character in American popular culture. This trope has a long history of use in Western cultures to mark someone as “foreign” in a very general sort of way. In fantasy media, it’s often used as a symbol of “generic Other”, along with “generic foreign accent” and other vaguely referential markers, while at the same time ducking accountability by being nonspecific.

From Geographies of Developing Areas: The Global South in a Changing World  By Glyn Williams, Paula Meth, Katie Willis. page 28.
Further Reading and Perspectives:
What Is Orientalism?
Orientalism, Edward Said (1977)
Orientalism in American Popular Culture by Naomi Rosenblatt. (Penn History Review, Vol. 16, Iss. 2 [2009], Art. 5)
The “Other” Histories of Fantasy and Fantasy’s “Othering” Fetish by Phenderson Djèlí Clark. (discusses Got and ASOIAF specifically; comparisons to the genre’s history)
[medievalpoc] notes on race versus clothing as a mark of the “Other” in European art history
The Turban is not a Hat: Queer Diaspora and Practices of Profiling by Jasbir K. Puar. Sikh Formations, Vol. 4, No. 1, June 2008, pp. 47-91. [screenreader inaccessible photocopy/image]
ZoomInfo

medievalpoc:

spacebunnysparkle-empress:

medievalpoc:

eliasand:

There were three sorts of Dornishmen, the first King Daeron had observed. There were the salty Dornishmen who lived along the coasts, the sandy Dornishmen of the deserts and long river valleys, and the stony Dornishmen who made their fastnesses in the passes and heights of the Red Mountains. The salty Domishmen had the most Rhoynish blood, the stony Dornishmen the least.

All three one sorts seemed well represented in Doran’s retinue. The salty Dornishmen were lithe and dark white as fuck, with smooth olive pale ass skin and long black hair racist turbans streaming in the wind. The sandy Dornishmen were even darker whiter, their faces burned brown white by the hot Dornish sun. They wound long bright scarfs around their helms to ward off sunstroke. The stony Dornishmen were biggest and fairest (finally some more white people up in here), sons of the Andals and the First Men, brownhaired or blond, with faces that freckled or burned in the sun instead of browning.

The lords wore silk and satin robes with jeweled belts and flowing sleeves. Their armor was heavily enameled and inlaid with burnished copper, shining silver, and soft red gold. They came astride red horses and golden ones and a few as pale as snow, all slim and swift, with long necks and narrow beautiful heads. The fabled sand steeds of Dorne were smaller than proper warhorses and could not bear such weight of armor, but it was said that they could run for a day and night and another day, and never tire.

#i took some liberty and corrected the shitty book version to make it into the vastly superior david&dan version #thank you for your time #who needs representation anyways since we all can see how spanish/italian inspired dorne obviously is

Thank you for this great gifset contrasted with the original text description of the Dornishmen. I think just about everyone was fairly disappointed in the casting here. It shouldn’t have to be pointed out that:

1. the books (ASOIAF) are not accurate to history in a general sense

2. the books are not accurate to history in the sense of dragons and magic

3. the show (Game of Thrones) is not accurate to the books in terms of people and casting as the characters are described, in many ways that do a disservice to people of color

4. this is inarguable whitewashing, and I do not generally use that term very often.

Once more, I’ll point out that Fantasy is not History. Once again, I’ll point out that whether or not Dorne is supposed to be ‘inspired by’ Medieval Spain or Italy, this is still inaccurate.

Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Spain’

Medievalpoc posts tagged ‘Italy’

"But these are aristocrats/nobility and I think that means something about my ideas on race and history”

Medievalpoc tagged “ASOIAF”

Medievalpoc tagged “Game of Thrones”

And a final reminder: These books and the show based on it were created on purpose by human beings for an audience-both of whom are modern people and part of American culture, right here, right now. The choices made, the casting, the storylines and plot points, all are conscious decisions made by people. Game of Thrones isn’t history, it is a fantasy show.

P.S. I personally am a fan of the show and the books, I have seen every episode and read every book, including some of the short fiction (so no worries about spoiling me).  I don’t feel particularly conflicted in being critical of it, or analyzing it.

can someone tell me why turbans are racist? isnt that a thing that people who live in very dry and hot climates wear? (and sometimes for religious reasons) isnt dorne really hot and dry? i mean, pretty much all of them should be way darker in skin tone but i dont know why turbans are racist… if there is a reason hmu with that knowledge. 

Since you apparently haven’t considered taking someone who is harmed by tropes like these at their word that they ARE, in fact, harmed by it, I’ll go ahead and give you a source you might actually accept. This is on the condition that maybe you consider who you think gets to “decide” what is and is not racism, and who you believe is harmed by depictions like this in popular fantasy media.

A turban is often used as a lazy way to visually “Other” a character in American popular culture. This trope has a long history of use in Western cultures to mark someone as “foreign” in a very general sort of way. In fantasy media, it’s often used as a symbol of “generic Other”, along with “generic foreign accent” and other vaguely referential markers, while at the same time ducking accountability by being nonspecific.

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From Geographies of Developing Areas: The Global South in a Changing World  By Glyn Williams, Paula Meth, Katie Willis. page 28.

Further Reading and Perspectives:

Source: stannisbaratheon


Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.
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Some wise words from Dame Julie.

(via wilwheaton)

Source: lejazzhot

秘密の関係DEATH

"

17% of cardiac surgeons are women, 17% of tenured professors are women. It just goes on and on. And isn’t that strange that that’s also the percentage of women in crowd scenes in movies? What if we’re actually training people to see that ratio as normal so that when you’re an adult, you don’t notice?

…We just heard a fascinating and disturbing study where they looked at the ratio of men and women in groups. And they found that if there’s 17% women, the men in the group think it’s 50-50. And if there’s 33% women, the men perceive that as there being more women in the room than men.

"

Source: NPR: Hollywood Needs More Women

Seriously, go listen to this.

(via josette-arnauld)

(via theremina)

captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]
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captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]
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captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]

(via thefunball)

Source: captainofalltheships

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